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14 Oregon 4-H Archery Member Manual
Chapter 6
Common Faults and How to Fix Them
Pattern
High arrows
Low arrows
Possible reasons
Arrow nocked low.
Pulling drawstring back too far.
Raising the bow arm during the release.
Pulling the hand down during release.
Dropping the bow arm during release.
Collapsing. (Bow arm moves to the right,
string hand moves out or forward.)
Creeping. (Reversing the drawing motion, or
allowing the arrow to move forward before
release.)
Leaning towards the target.
Arrow placed on shelf instead of rest.
How to correct
Check the nocking point frequently.
Be sure the nocking point is perpendicular to
the arrow shelf so that the arrow, when nocked,
is perpendicular to the string.
Maintain a consistent anchor point.
Concentrate on form.
Look right down the arrow at the target.
Maintain follow through until the arrow hits
the target.
Lightly grip the bow, allowing it to rock
forward naturally when you release it.
Maintain follow through until the arrow hits
the target.
Lightly grip the bow, allowing it to rock
forward naturally when you release it.
Keep the bow arm at the same height as at
full draw.
Continue pulling.
Maintain a consistent anchor point.
Continue pulling through with one motion
all the way through the release.
Stand up straight.
Place arrow on the rest.
It can be difficult to determine why arrows are landing where
they are. Watching where arrows land on the target face can help
you identify shooting form errors. Archers with good and consistent
shooting form should shoot their arrows in a group. A group is
when the arrows are all close together, even if the group is not in
the center.
Here are some arrow patterns and common errors that cause the
patterns.
Archival copy. For current version, see: https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/4-h361
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