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6
In 1976, ARP released a small 16 step sequencer in the form of 2 independent 8 step
sequences. This became famous and is still very sought after (it is emulated in the ARP2600
V.) The same year they presented the Omni, which would become one of ARPs biggest
successes. The instrument allowed the combination of two polyphonic violin sounds a great
innovation for the company and 2 monophonic bass sounds.
In 1976, ARP released a small 16-step sequencer in the form of two independent 8-step
sequences. This became famous and is still very sought after (it is emulated in the ARP2600
V.) The same year they presented the Omni, which would become one of ARPs biggest
successes. The instrument allowed the combination of two polyphonic violin sounds a great
innovation for the company and two monophonic bass sounds.
But in 1981, ARP was finally bought out by CBS. The following year, CBS with part of the ARP
development team would produce the Chroma, a programmable polyphonic synthesizer, and
in 1984 the Chroma Polaris, a simplified and MIDI-capable version of the Chroma.
1.2 A better emulation thanks to TAE®
TAE® - True Analog Emulation - is a new technology dedicated to the digital reproduction of
analog circuits used in vintage synthesizers.
When implemented in software code, TAE’s algorithms guarantee authentic emulation of
hardware specifications. This is why your ARP2600 V offers an unparalleled quality of sound.
In detail, TAE® combines four major advances in the domain of synthesis:
1.2.1 Aliasing-free oscillators
Standard digital synthesizers produce aliasing in high frequencies, and also when using Pulse
Width Modulation or FM.
TAE® allows the production of totally aliasing-free oscillators in all contexts (PWM, FM…), and
at no extra CPU cost.
Linear frequency spectrum of an existing well-known software synthesizer
Aliasing
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